Interviews

“I just went with my gut (and shut down my ego) and let the story tell itself”: An Interview with Mira Ptacin

“I just went with my gut (and shut down my ego) and let the story tell itself”: An Interview with Mira Ptacin

Mira Ptacin’s new book is an exploration of Spiritualism’s history and its place in the current landscape of American faith practices. It also shows us, through the personal story Ptacin includes, how Spiritualism can help those still living and grieving after a loved one has died.

“Writing about motherhood provides a great vantage point from which to write about society”: An Interview with Jessamine Chan

“Writing about motherhood provides a great vantage point from which to write about society”: An Interview with Jessamine Chan

The double-sided expectations are the heart of Jessamine Chan’s debut novel. Motherhood is deeply personal and yet easily judged by Instagram followers and the state alike. Chan’s book asks: Can motherhood be measured by the performance of it?

“To write about Geppetto is to write about fatherhood, and at the same time he is a creator of a monster”: An Interview with Edward Carey

“To write about Geppetto is to write about fatherhood, and at the same time he is a creator of a monster”: An Interview with Edward Carey

Pinocchio is such a fixture of culture that most authors would be too nervous to interact with the classic story in any extended way. Edward Carey’s latest novel is audacious in this regard, giving us the untold tale of Geppetto in bold illustration and dynamic, resonant text.

“Paris, in its own way, is a character in the book”: An Interview with David Hoon Kim

“Paris, in its own way, is a character in the book”: An Interview with David Hoon Kim

David Hoon Kim’s debut novel is as much about its protagonist and the characters around him as it is about the city itself, as much about the narrative momentum created through his wanderings as it is about the languages that carry and charge through him.

“Unfortunately, the Book Continues to Be Relevant”: An Interview with Erika Meitner

“Unfortunately, the Book Continues to Be Relevant”: An Interview with Erika Meitner

When Erika Meitner was in the process of adopting her youngest son, she was surprised to discover just how many households in her neighborhood had firearms. Erika Meitner’s new poetry collection uses these two life events to examine safety, violence, and raising a family in rural Appalachia.

“Ultimately, we Black women are singing from the same hymnal, whether we are talking about food, love, our mothers, or the church”: An Interview with Deesha Philyaw

“Ultimately, we Black women are singing from the same hymnal, whether we are talking about food, love, our mothers, or the church”: An Interview with Deesha Philyaw

Deesha Philyaw’s debut story collection skillfully blends inward reflection with outward mother-daughter battle, the narratives softened within the larger embrace of a nurturing, cross-generational women’s world that transcends particular times and places.