Interviews

“These two books, taken together, offer a nice survey of my anxieties and preoccupations over the past decade”: An Interview with J. Robert Lennon

“These two books, taken together, offer a nice survey of my anxieties and preoccupations over the past decade”: An Interview with J. Robert Lennon

J. Robert Lennon’s new novel and short story collection, both released last week, offer up an aesthetic of the uncompromising, the surprising, and the fantastic, either cloaked in the everyday or surreally spread.

“What are the conditions of contemplation to exist in an alien planet?”: An Interview with Mauro Javier Cárdenas

“What are the conditions of contemplation to exist in an alien planet?”: An Interview with Mauro Javier Cárdenas

Reading Cárdenas’s second novel, with its intricately patterned sentences circling obsessively around an absent center, it’s hard to shake the feeling that the author has done something remarkable, inventing an entirely original language for representing the fractured sensation of being conscious in the twenty-first century.

“It’s the coolest part about writing, that you never know where it is going to wash up”: An Interview with Maggie Smith

“It’s the coolest part about writing, that you never know where it is going to wash up”: An Interview with Maggie Smith

Smith’s first nonfiction offering is a product of a project she took on in a time of grief: she took to Twitter to offer herself a daily public pep talk in the form of three sentences or less. The resulting works, segmented in the book by paragraphs of hindsight commentary, are like poems with purpose.

“The characters in the novel are shameless about their bodies”: An Interview with K-Ming Chang

“The characters in the novel are shameless about their bodies”: An Interview with K-Ming Chang

Part myth, part bildungsroman, part queer love story with a lyric, fabulist delivery, Chang’s debut novel, out today, is a novel of the body—its mundane functions, its power to create life, the ways in which it decays—as well as what can be done to a body—by war, from domestic violence, when aroused.

“When does that line between the real and imagined begin to blur?”: An Interview with Sulaiman Addonia

“When does that line between the real and imagined begin to blur?”: An Interview with Sulaiman Addonia

While Addonia’s new novel gives us innumerable examples of what is missing from the lives of his characters, living in a refugee camp after their country is swept into war, each is combatted with a bout of illusion, a tactic to conquer the absences and to enliven what remains: their lives.